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In the Arctic, climate change is happening three times faster than the global rate. These changes present considerable risks: the region faces several climate change-related “tipping points” as well as geopolitical and militarization threats, all of which have major ramifications both for Indigenous communities and the international community at large. The Arctic has historically been a region of peace and cooperation, even during times of tensions, and climate change could provide new opportunities for economic development. However, without proper risk mitigation and climate adaptation efforts, the opportunities will likely be overshadowed by the destabilizing, compounding effects of climate change.

About the Author

Marisol Maddox

Marisol Maddox

Arctic Analyst, Polar Institute
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Polar Institute

Since its inception in 2017, the Polar Institute has become a premier forum for discussion and policy analysis of Arctic and Antarctic issues, and is known in Washington, DC and elsewhere as the Arctic Public Square. The Institute holistically studies the central policy issues facing these regions—with an emphasis on Arctic governance, climate change, economic development, scientific research, security, and Indigenous communities—and communicates trusted analysis to policymakers and other stakeholders.  Read more