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Mexico is one of the United States' biggest trading partners, consistently ranking as its second and third biggest importer and exporter. Between 2014 and 2018 (the latest for which data is available), Mexico's relationship with the United States was unwavering. Even during periods of more restrictive trade policies, total trade between Mexico and the U.S. remained steady.

During this period, the U.S. lost about 373,000 trade-related jobs but added some 125,000 jobs related specifically to trade with Mexico, marginally increasing Mexico's share of the U.S. trade job market from 11.8% to 12.3%.

Of the fifty states plus the District of Columbia, 32 saw their total trade-related job pool shrink by an average of 35,000 jobs. However, six of those federal entities added jobs related to trade with Mexico, while only one showed a loss of them. In that same time period, 19 states expanded their trade-related job pool by an average of 39,000 jobs. All but two of those added jobs related to Mexican trade specifically.

In this infographic, Mexico Institute Intern Samantha Kane Jiménez highlights the major changes in the bilateral trade relationship.


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About the Author

Samantha Kane Jiménez

Samantha Kane Jiménez

Intern, Mexico Institute
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Mexico Institute

The Mexico Institute seeks to improve understanding, communication, and cooperation between Mexico and the United States by promoting original research, encouraging public discussion, and proposing policy options for enhancing the bilateral relationship. A binational Advisory Board, chaired by Luis Téllez and Earl Anthony Wayne, oversees the work of the Mexico Institute.   Read more